vendredi 7 mars 2014

Common errors

Aqui abz-ingles deja una lista de 50 errores comunes. El objetivo de esta lista es ayudar a evitar a que más estudiantes caigan el errores comunes al momento de escribir o expresarse.

 

The farmer has a lot of calfs but no sheeps. (Plurals)
The farmer has a lot of calves but no sheep.


The news are bad, and the people is worried. (Plural nouns)
The news is bad, and the people are worried.


Its my parent’s car. (Apostrophes, possessives, contractions)
It’s my parents’ car.


I started learning english last june. (Capital letters)
I started learning English last June.


Are you teacher? No, I am doctor. (Indefinite article: a, an)
Are you a teacher? No, I am a doctor.


The life, it is beautiful. (Definite article: the)
Life is beautiful.


I don’t have some sugar but I have any milk. (Some/any, etc)
I don’t have any sugar but I have some milk.


He has many money but not much friend. (Count and no count nouns, many/much)
He has a lot of money but not many friends.


He has few money and little friends. (Count and no count nouns, few/little)
He has little money but not many friends.


Each are unique, but all of them is good. (All/ever/each/whole/entire)
Each is unique, but all of them are good.


She is more shorter than her son. (Comparative)
She is shorter than her son.


It’s the modernest building of the city. (Superlative)
It’s the most modern building in the city.


Our house is enough big and it has bedrooms enough. (Enough, too)
Our house is big enough and it has enough bedrooms.


He is a so good friend. (So/such)
He is such a good friend


He knows he can’t write good. (Adverbs)
He knows he can’t write well.


It’s a two doors car. (Compound adjectives)
It’s a two-door car.


They lived in a brick white old house. (Adjective order)
They lived in an old white brick.


He approached carefully the building. (Adverb placement)
He carefully approached the building.


Do you can meet me at the restaurant? (Modals)
Can you meet me at the restaurant?


She have a brother who live in Mexico. (Third-person singular)
She has a brother who lives in Mexico.


You are drive too fast. (Present continuous, simple present)
You are driving too fast.


I haven’t saw him because he haven’t come home yet. (Present perfect)
I haven’t seen him because he hasn’t come home yet.


I haven’t gone to Mali but I have visited Chad in 2006. (Simple past, present perfect)
I haven’t been to Mali but I visited Chad in 2006.


I am sitting here since two hours. (Present perfect continuous, for, since)
I have been here for two hours.


By then, the guest of honor left. (Past perfect)
By then, the guest of honor had left.


The church has offer meals to homeless people. (Participles following auxiliaries)
The church has offered meals to homeless people.


It was the most depressed movie I’ve ever seen. (Participles as adjectives)
It was the most depressing movie I’ve ever seen.


I was living in France, but I left in 2002. (Used to as auxiliary)
I used to live in France, but i left in 2002.


I will tell him when I will see him tomorrow. (Time clauses, when)
I will tell him when I see him tomorrow.


We recommend that you are prepared. (Subjunctive)
We recommend that you be prepared.


If I would live here, I would run every day. (Conditional sentences)
If I lived here, I would run every day.


If I would have seen it, she would have told me. (Conditional sentences)
If she had seen it, she would have told me.


She wishes you live nearer. (Wish)
She wishes you lived nearer.


One speaks English here. (Passive voice)
English is spoken here.


When begins the class? (Questions with auxiliaries)
When does the class begin?


He told that he is hungry. (Reported statements, tell/say)
He said that he was hungry.


He asked where is my mother. (Reported question)
He asked where my mother was.


He told me don’t do it. (Reported commands)
He told me not to do it.


I want speak English but I can’t to speak English. (Infinitives with and without to)
I want to speak English but I can’t speak English.


She finished her paper and handed in it. (Phrasal Verbs)
She finished her paper and handed it in.


I came here for to learn English. (Infinitive of purpose)
I came here to learn English.


I still miss my father that I loved dearly. (Relative clauses)
I still miss my father who I loved dearly.


Las night is the time it happened then. (Relative adverbs)
Last night is the time when it happened.


He was right, isn’t it? (Tag questions)
He was right, wasn’t he?


There is dark, but it is some stores that are still open. (There is, It is, etc)
It is dark, but there are some stores that are still open.


The place where I work there is one hour away. (Repetition of sentence elements)
The place where I work is one hour away.


I cut my hair at the hairdresser’s on West Street. (Have/get (something done))
I have my hair cut at the hairdresser’s on West Street.


You mustn’t be so polite. (Must, have to)
You don’t have to be so polite.


When I go to stay with you, I will take it. (Come/go/bring/take)
When I come to stay with you, I will bring it.


I am used to drive on the right, not the left. (Be used to, get used to)
I am used to drive on the right, not the left.

 

 

See also:

Common Phrasal Verbs Irregular Verbs List
Common Idioms Thematic list of Idioms
Common misspellings Phrasal Verbs Particles list
Common Preposition List Lista de Términos Gramaticales
Regular vs Irregular Verbs Abz Grammar Top Tips

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